Recovery after Climbing

Research > Research Inventory > Bioenergetics: Recovery after Climbing

Effect of hypohydration on climbing to failure on a treadwall

AUTHORS: K. D. Hewitt, T. France, G. Gonzalez, M. Probst, C. R.Winter, V. Paolone | Year: 2016
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers studied impact of normal hydration vs. a lack of hydration. While not significant, the average time of climbing for those normally hydrated climbers was slightly longer and the average oxygen consumption slightly higher.
REFERENCE: 3rd Rock Climbing Research Congress. Proceedings 2016, Telluride, CO
https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/441095_76117ef587b34539bc29d428a39b366b.pdf

Oxygen recovery kinetics in the forearm flexors of multiple ability groups of rock climbers

AUTHORS: Simon Fryer, Tabitha Dickson, Lee Stoner, Johnathan Hughes, Steve Draper, Stephen How, Michael McCluskey and Nick Draper  |  Year: 2015
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Research studied deoxygenation and recovery in beginner, intermediate, and elite climbers. In elite climbers, much greater deoxygenation occurred, but recovery also occurred much faster. Lower level climbers should focus on finding appropriate places to rest on a climb.
REFERENCE: Oxygen recovery kinetics in the forearm flexors of multiple ability groups of rock climbers. – PubMed – NCBI.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25536538

The blood lactate concentration responses in a real indoor sport climbing competition

AUTHORS: Gáspari, A., Berton, R., Lixandrão, M., Perlotti Piunti, R., Chacon-Mikahil, M., & Bertuzzi, R.  |  Year: 2015
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers analyzed blood lactate (a byproduct of the body’s use of simple sugars formed in association with muscular fatigue, often associated with being “pumped”) concentration in eight finals competitors before the competition and at intervals after semi-finals and finals. They found a significant increase in blood lactate concentration, suggesting that climbers increase their reliance on the anaerobic lactic (a system which uses glucose as a fuel) energy system as climbs increase in difficulty.
REFERENCE: The blood lactate concentration responses in a real indoor sport climbing competition. Science & Sports, 30(4), 228-231.
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0765159715000738

Effect of load and recovery time on the intermittent climbing performance until exhaustion

AUTHORS: J. Balas, M. Simkanin | Year: 2014
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers tested 15 climbers using three climbing workloads: continuous, intermittent with 30 second climbing and 30 second recovery, and intermittent with 60 second climbing and 60 second recovery. Researchers suggest that intermittent climbing workload with shorter period of workload and recovery enables greater intensity and higher cardiovascular response than continuous climbing. Additionally, non-specific aerobic training is associated with a faster recovery during the rest period.
REFERENCE: Czech Kinanthrpology, Vol 18, No 1 (2014)
http://www.ceskakinantropologie.cz/index.php/TestJournal/article/viewArticle/341

Physiological responses in rock climbing with repeated ascents over a 10-week period

AUTHORS: V. Espana-Romero, R. L. Jensen, X. Sanchez, M. L. Ostrowski, J. E. Szekely, P. B. Watts. | Year: 2012
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers looked at the body’s response and energy expenditure (using expired air) during climbing as well as after climbing of 9 climbers on the same climbing route across a 10-week period (nine ascents). Repeated ascents of a climbing route decreased both the climbing time as well as energy expenditure during climbing. Although initially energy expenditure after climbing went up, by the final ascent it had dropped below energy expenditure for the first ascent.
REFERENCE: Eur J Appl Physiol. 2012 Mar;112(3):821-8
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21674246

Effect of rock climbing training on strength, speed and endurance

AUTHORS: P. Kaundra, Y. L. Jethwa | Year: 2011
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers looked at the impact of a 28 day rock climbing training program on physical fitness components. Researchers recommend strength endurance of the abdominal muscles and shoulder muscles, as well as forearm strength and endurance.
REFERENCE: Journal of Exercise Science and Physiotherapy, Vol. 7, No. 1: 19-23, (2011)
http://medind.nic.in/jau/t11/i1/jaut11i1p19.pdf

Changes in EMG and finger force with repeated hangs from the hands in rock climbers

AUTHORS: P. B. Watts, R. L. Jensen, S. M. Agena, J. A. Majchrzak, R. A. Schellinger, C. S. Wubbels | Year: 2008
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers used hang time, recovery time and electromyography (recording of electrical activity of muscle tissue) to study 5 experienced rock climbers on a hangboard using an intermittent test of 8 maximum hang repetitions separated by either 1 or 3 minute intervals. Researchers found that overall decline in hang time across all eight repetitions was less for 3 minute rests than for 1 minute rests, even while peak force of the fingers showed no change across either resting strategy.
REFERENCE: Int J Exerc Sci. 2008; 1(2): 62–70.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4739290/

Effects of active recovery on lactate concentration, heart rate and RPE in climbing

AUTHORS: N. Draper, E. L. Bird, I. Coleman, C. Hodgson  | Year: 2006
SUMMARY/RESULTS: This study sought out to confirm that active rest was more effective than passive rest, and asked whether shorter durations of active rest would still be more effective. Blood lactate (a byproduct of the body’s use of simple sugars formed in association with muscular fatigue, often associated with being “pumped”) concentrations and “rate of perceived exertion” were both lower in climbers who participated in active rest, even at shorter durations than passive rest. The researchers propose that walking could be a beneficial active rest activity for climbers, with the forearms being a major tissue of lactate production, and the legs being a major tissue of lactate removal in this scenario.
REFERENCE: Draper, N., Bird, E. L., Coleman, I., & Hodgson, C. (2006). Effects of active recovery on lactate concentration, heart rate and RPE in climbing. Journal of sports science & medicine, 5(1), 97.
http://www.jssm.org/vol5/n1/11/v5n1-11text.php

Metabolic response during sport rock climbing and the effects of active versus passive recovery

AUTHORS: Watts PB1Daggett MGallagher PWilkins B. | Year: 2000
SUMMARY/RESULTS: esearchers looked at the difference in active recovery (using a recumbent cycling) vs. passive recovery, in indoor climbers using a series of variables including oxygen consumption, heart rate, handgrip strength and blood lactate (a byproduct of the body’s use of simple sugars formed in association with muscular fatigue, often associated with being “pumped”). Researchers suggest that active recovery can significantly reduce blood lactate within 20 minutes following a difficult climb, but stress that further research is necessary to determine the viability of such a strategy.
REFERENCE: Int J Sports Med. 2000 Apr;21(3):185-90.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10834350

Acute changes in handgrip strength, endurance, and blood lactate with sustained sport rock climbing

AUTHORS: Watts P1Newbury VSulentic J. | Year: 1996
SUMMARY/RESULTS: Researchers studied how grip strength and grip endurance are effected by sustained continuous climbing slightly above ones Onsight ability. Researchers determined that handgrip strength recovers faster than hand grip endurance after a climb.
REFERENCE: J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 1996 Dec;36(4):255-60.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9062048